Tuesday, 18 June 2024, 01:52 PM

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Glossary: Glossary | English

B

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Difference between the spot price of the underlying and the price of the corresponding futures. One speaks of a positive base if the forward price is higher than the spot price and from a negative base if the forward price is lower than the spot price.

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A basis point is 1/100 of a percentage point, i.e. 0.01%. The difference in yield between two bonds is usually given in basis points. (The difference between Bond A with 7.55% and Bond B with 7.83% is 28 basis points.)

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The risk that prices of similar, but not identical instruments do not fully correlate.

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syn: index swapinterest rate swap in which two variable interest rates are exchanged e.g. 3-months USD LIBOR against US-CP composite rateopposite: coupon swapv. interest rate swap

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1/100 of one percentage point i.e. 0,01 %

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abbr. of British Bankers Association

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An investor with pessimistic market expectation, unlike a bull.

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Combined option strategy that is implemented in anticipation of a price decrease. It can be based on both the simultaneous purchase and sale of call options and put options. Accordingly, a distinction is made between a Bear Call Spread and a Bear Put Spread.

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security which entitles the bearer to claim the certified rights

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An equity security that is wholly owned by whoever holds the physical stock certificate. The issuing firm neither registers the owner of the stock, nor does it track transfers of ownership. The company disperses dividends to bearer shares when a physical coupon is presented to the firm. Unless the articles of the corporation provides otherwise, each share is a bearer share.

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Stock market jargon for the expectation of declining prices. The bear is that animal, which is hitting the prices lower with his paws. Contrast: bullish.

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The performance of a predetermined set of securities, used for comparison purposes. Such sets may be based on published indexes or may be customized to suit an investment strategy.

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A coefficient measuring a stocks relative volatility to a market index, such as the S&P 500 Index. A manager with a Beta greater than 1.0 is more volatile than the market, while a manager with a Beta less than 1.0 is less volatile than the market.

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A fixed percentage for calculation of the regulatory capital charge under the standardised approach for operational risk. The beta relates the level of required capital to the level of the gross income for each of eight business lines.

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see also basic indicator approach

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v. bid-rate

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It is the difference between bid and ask price of a financial instrument.

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price at which the quoting bank is prepared to purchase a financial instrument (foreign exchange, securities etc.),opposite: ask

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Rates in foreign exchange markets are usually quoted in 5 digits (e.g. EUR/USD 1.0125; USD/JPY 120.50). The first 3 digits are called big figure and the last 2 digits pips. Professional FX-market participants usually quote just the pips of an FX-Rate, whereas the big figure is assumed to be known.

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An agreement between two counterparties where the value of all in-the-money contracts is offset by the value of all out-of-the-money contracts. This results in a single net exposure amount owed by one counterparty.Bilateral netting can be multi-product and encompass portfolios of swaps, interest rate options and forward foreign exchange.